Pupil Premium Strategy Statement - 2017/18

  1. Summary information

School

Ashton Community Science College

Academic Year

2017/8

Total PP budget

£240,830

Date of most recent PP Review (external)

Jan17

Total number of pupils

692

Number of pupils eligible for PP

270

Date for next internal review of this strategy

Oct 17

 

  1. Current attainment (based on results 2017)

 

Pupils eligible for PP (your school)

Pupils not eligible for PP (national average)

% of students achieving 4+ in English and Maths

30%

 

% of students achieving 5+ in English and Maths

16.28%

 

Progress 8

-0.45

 

Attainment 8

36.58

 

  1. Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP)

In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor literacy skills)

  1.  

Literacy skills: The Literacy skills of some of our students are below age-expectations which affects their ability to access the wider curriculum. Many students do not read for pleasure and have limited access to both fiction and non-fiction books.

  1.  

Behaviour of some PP students: Students eligible for PP are more likely to be removed from lessons or to spend time in FTEC/ excluded from school.

 

  1.  

Engagement and attainment of students: Increasing the engagement of students in school and in lessons will lead to increased attainment.   

 

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

D.

Attendance rates:  Current attendance rates for students eligible for PP are 94% (below the target for all children of 95% and 2% below other students). This reduces their school hours and causes them to fall behind on average.

E.

Low aspirations or a lack of aspirations: Some of our students enter with low aspirations and little idea of further option available to them post 16. As they progress to KS4, some students retain these low aspirations and whilst they are exposed to independent CEIAG, they have still not made a decision regarding next steps.

F.

Low levels of parental support/ lack of a positive role model: Some of our students experience challenging home circumstances which impacts on the way in which students and parents/ carers engage with school: a lack of engagement with school by parents / carers; poor student attendance; difficulty completing homework to the deadlines set and a lack of effort in school are some of the effects seen in school.

  1. Desired outcomes (desired outcomes and how they will be measured)

Success criteria

  1.  

Literacy skills: High levels of progress in literacy for all students eligible for PP

 

  • Students eligible for PP make expected progress in English
  • 80% of students with below functional Literacy skills achieve functionality

 

  1.  

Behaviour of some PP students: Reduction in the number of FTE/ FTEC visits and C1 & C2 logs

 

  

  • Half termly analysis of data shows reduction in number of incidents when compared with data from 2016-2017
  1.  

Engagement and attainment of students: Increasing the engagement of students in lessons will lead to increased attainment.   

 

  • Teaching and learning is anchored on clear learning outcomes which are referenced throughout lessons and evidenced via lesson observations which show that students are engaged in their learning.
  • Increased resilience is observed e.g. Outward Bound
  • The outcomes for PP students are broadly in line with those of national NPP students

 

  1.  

Attendance rates: Improved attendance rates for students eligible for PP

 

  • The Attendance of PP students meets at least the 95% threshold and is broadly in line with that of NPP students
  1.  

Low aspirations or a lack of aspirations: All students are able to progress onto their chosen pathway (course/ apprenticeship) which is appropriate to their ability. The likelihood of PP students becoming NEET is in line with that of NPP students nationally

 

  • All KS4 students have identified their progression route at the end of KS4.
  • All students are aware of the entry requirements and GCSE grades or qualifications needed for the next stage in their learning journey
  1.  

Low levels of parental support/ lack of a positive role model: Increased levels of parental engagement.

  • An increased number of events are offered to parents to engage with them e.g. Year 9 and 11 Induction evening, community café/ crêche
  • Hard to reach parents engage with the school by attending at least 1 event or meeting to discuss their child’s attainment

 

  1. Planned expenditure
  • Academic year

2017-2018

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the Pupil Premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

 

Section 1: Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

High levels of progress in literacy for all students eligible for PP

 

INSET training for all staff with a focus on developing retrieval skills and communicating this through increased literacy skills

Good literacy skills underpin students’ ability to engage in the curriculum and make progress. A consistent staff approach to literacy will ensure that all staff share the responsibility to increase the literacy levels of our students.

INSET training dates will be outlined at the start of the school year in the school calendar.

Faculty and SLT work scrutiny will include Literacy lead and assess the consistency of application of school policy and enable areas to be addressed if necessary.

N Walmsley

Following the INSET sessions.

 

Half termly

Increase monitoring of all students in KS3 to include reading ages/ spelling ages. Track the scores at various points in the school year

Ensuring that all staff have a full understanding of students’ functionality will result in lessons being pitched correctly and appropriate scaffolding being planned where necessary so that all students are able to access the curriculum.

Reading age & spelling age review dates to be formalised.

SLT LM to monitor that testing is taking place and that staff are being updated accordingly.

 

 

S Schultz

(C Parkinson)

Following reviews of reading and spelling ages and according to the school calendar.

 

 

Develop ways in which the impact of the literacy drive on student outcomes across school can be monitored, tracked and evaluated.

Understanding the impact of the literacy drive means that activities can be reviewed or changed if they are not having the desired effect.

Line Management meetings (as per school calendar) will include discussion on impact of actions on outcomes.

SLT LM to monitor

 

C Kelly

(N Walmsley)

Following LM discussion

 

 

English and Maths staff liaise with identified Primary schools to ensure full knowledge of KS2 curriculum and avoid repetition

Students need to build on the progress that they made during Key Stage 2 if they are to maximise progress during Key Stage 3.

Visits to be arranged with Primary colleagues and overseen via ACE cluster

 

N Courtney

D Woodcock

(J Hoyle)

Termly via LM notes

Reduction in the number of FTE/ FTEC visits and C1 & C2 logs

 

Improve attainment by further reduction of challenging behaviour in lessons.

Evidence suggests that behaviour interventions can improve academic performance as well as decreasing problematic behaviour. By consistently dealing with challenging behaviour and rewarding positive behaviour, we hope to increase the attainment of all students.

 

Lesson observations show that school policy is followed consistently by all staff.

Rewards programme is well publicised and allows students to ‘purchase’ rewards at key points in the school year.

Form tutors ensure that students complete their 10 minute detentions for grump faces.

N Walmsley

 

 

C Ringrose

 

 

 

 

SLT Year links

 

Half termly

 

 

Engagement and attainment of students

INSET: developing a Growth mind set

Research shows that when students have a Growth Mindset, they have increased resilience and this leads to raised levels of attainment. We have decided to adopt this as a school approach and therefore ensure consistency in the language and strategies used across all teaching colleagues.

INSET on 29th September will focus on the key concepts.

 

N Walmsley

Termly via feedback from HoF/ HoS following QA.

Investment in technology to support students’ learning; for example, Insight so that home learning tasks can be completed independently.

Using digital technology to ensure that all students have full and detailed access to their homework enables students to meet deadlines. Homework completion has improved since using this system and parental log-ins are well received by parents who can support task completion and open conversations about learning.

HoF monitor that homework is being set according to the school policy and recorded on Insight with sufficient support/ adequate explanation.

Overall usage of Insight is monitored. Identified colleagues to complete data analysis (ATN) and act on it (NWY). 

Progress Leaders use interventions to remove barriers preventing homework completion.

N Walmsley

Half termly

 

 

 

All teaching staff have one hour of school support as part of their teaching allocation to contribute towards raised standards.

 

Evidence suggests that when TAs or other adults support students’ learning rather than manage learning attainment can be increased.

All colleagues have one hour of RST allocated on their timetable as part of their teaching commitment.

Identify students and the subjects in which they need support to meet targets fairly and transparently.

Colleagues supporting teaching staff discuss and agree on how the support is best provided.

Impact of support is reviewed following the subsequent data capture allowing support to be redirected if necessary.

J Hoyle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Following data captures as per school calendar

 

 

 

 

 

 

Focus on further developing the quality of teaching and learning across the school in order to maximise learning gains from all students.

Quality first teaching is essential if students are to achieve in line with targets set and maximise their learning. Feedback following the PP review 2017 suggested embedding the good practice which already exists with regard to ensuring T&L in classrooms is anchored on clear learning outcomes which are referenced throughout lessons; that questioning during lessons is directed to ensure high levels of challenge and enables students to provide appropriate feedback and using the consolidate phase of lessons to discuss learning.

T&L identified as a priority in the SIP 2017-2018.

INSET sessions throughout the school year focus on specific aspects of T&L.

Lesson observations and discussion with colleagues/students will enable impact of INSET to be evaluated. 

N Walmsley

Termly

Total budgeted cost

£ 37,921

 

Section 2: Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

High levels of progress in literacy for all students eligible for PP

 

IDL for targeted students to address dyslexia

 

The IDL programme has been used with students previously and has a good success rate. Effective literacy skills are essential for students to be able to access the wider curriculum.

Planned 10 week intervention blocks allocated to staff timetable and with attendees planned in advance.

S Schultz

(C Parkinson)

At end of each 10 week  block

 

In line with DC cycle

 

At LM meetings

 

 

 

EAL specialist support

Students who have English as an additional language need additional input to help them acquire their English  literacy skills and therefore access the curriculum

Planned sessions allocated to staff timetable for specialist EAL work.

Action plans for each EAL student produced with clear targets which are then shared with all subject teachers. Reviews conducted in line with timescales identified on action plan.

 

B Salters

(C Parkinson)

In line with EAL review cycle.

 

At LM meetings

Additional English class Yr 7 & Yr8

Students arriving without functional literacy at the beginning of Year 7 need additional support to ensure that they achieve and are then able to maintain this standard prior to beginning GCSE courses

Curriculum structure includes allocation of an additional group.

QA by HoF will take into account:

  • lesson observation,
  • data capture,
  • students’ work
  • interviews with members of the group.

N Courtney

In line with DC cycle

 

At LM meetings

 

1:1/ small group intervention in English lessons

Focused regular sessions aimed at addressing specific weaknesses are effective in helping students improve.

Intervention sessions will be clearly timetabled with intended outcome shared in advance of sessions with TA3.

Sessions will have clear focus.

Progress of students will be monitored by teacher delivering and overseen by HoF

S Roberts

(N Courtney/ A Scarborough)

 

In line with DC cycle

Reduction in the number of FTE/ FTEC visits and C1 & C2 logs

 

Mentoring role to support students identified as being at risk of FTE/ FTEC visits

Evidence suggests that behaviour interventions can contribute to improvements in academic performance as well as a decrease in problematic behaviours. (EEF) This is more effective on a 1:1 basis and this is the approach that we have adopted.

Weekly meetings take place between DHT and FTEC manager to identify students.

Support is provided to students via 1:1 sessions, classroom support and is linked to a programme of rewards.

R Unwin/ T Hesketh

N Walmsley

Half termly

 

 

Engagement and attainment of students

Duke of Edinburgh award Scheme

There is strong evidence that resilience in the classroom can be developed via the development of teamwork and communication skills through outdoor activity. The DofE scheme requires students to engage in activity that is sustained over time and therefore develop tenacity and resilience as well as learning new skills and developing social conscience.

 

Colleagues volunteer to run the DofE programme.

Information disseminated to students during assembly.

Initial meeting held to introduce the programme to students.

Planned sessions timetabled in advance.

Staff support for expeditions clarified in advance and dates included on school calendar.

H Ascroft

 

Termly

Improved attendance rates for students eligible for PP

 

Attendance Officer and Progress Leaders monitor students and immediately follow up truancies/ unauthorised absences. 

 

 

 

Attainment cannot be improved if students are absent from school. Addressing attendance is a key step as identified by NFER briefing for school leaders.

Identification of specific students for whom attendance falls below school target to be monitored by PL and Attendance Officer.

Rapid response system to address poor attendance – staff contact home on first day of absence using the text messaging service.

Staff to work with families to identify and address barriers to attendance.

Attendance discussed fortnightly.

Discussions to take place re barriers to attendance.

D Bradshaw
T Walsh

Progress leaders

 

 Half termly

 

 

All students are able to progress onto their chosen pathway (course/ apprenticeship) which is appropriate to their ability.

Extra-curricular intervention programme

The extra-curricular intervention programme which takes place during the Easter and May half term holidays has previously been successful evidenced by the positive impact it has had on students’ confidence and exam performance.

Sessions will be co-ordinated by the DHT.

Students will be identified and invited to attend the sessions.

Teachers will plan and deliver the sessions.

J Hoyle

Following the Easter and May half term holidays.

Following publication of GCSE results.

 

 

A personalised approach to the curriculum which meets the needs of students.

For students to be able to progress onto their chosen pathway, alternative provision sometimes needs to be considered to avoid exclusions/ ensure students remain engaged in education.

Students at risk are highlighted by PL or via behavioural records.

Targeted CEIAG to identify future pathways.

Appropriate provision is sourced and monitored by regular phone calls/ staff visits

J Hoyle

According to DC cycle

 

 

Develop a strategically planned approach to CEIAG specifically to address the needs of PP students which includes one to one input for targeted students for IAG to help inform their curriculum choice, increase motivation and raise aspirations/ attainment.

One to one support is seen as an effective way to increase attainment. This will be used as an additional intervention to address issues presented by students (underachievement/ negative approach to learning/ behavioural issues).

Students access ‘Fast Tomato’ to inform them of future options

One to one interviews highlighted in the school calendar; emails sent out to all staff for their support n releasing students.

J Long

(J Hoyle)

Half termly

 

 

Increased employer engagement and awareness of the link between the school curriculum and future study.

Helping students to understand the relevance of the school curriculum as a contributory factor towards their Post 16 choices is essential. Having this understanding increases intrinsic motivation and contributes towards raised attainment.

All subject areas plan and deliver information about how their subject area fits into the job market.

 

J Long

(J Hoyle)

Termly

Increased levels of parental engagement.

Progress Leaders target ‘hard to reach’ parents in order to encourage their engagement with school/ attendance at school events

Evidence suggests that attainment can be increased where there is good communication between school and home.

Attendance of parents at school events is recorded allowing ‘hard to reach’ parents to be identified.

Targeted parents are invited personally to school events

J Hoyle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total budgeted cost

£ 132,907

 

Section 3: Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

High levels of progress in literacy for all students eligible for PP

 

Encourage reading: drop everything and read

Encouraging students to develop a love of reading at a young age will help them acquire the literacy skills necessary for them to be able to access the wider curriculum successfully.

 

C Kelly

(N Walmsley)

 

Encourage reading: Year 7 book

Encouraging students to develop a love of reading at a young age will help them acquire the literacy skills necessary for them to be able to access the wider curriculum successfully.

Book purchased for Year 7 students and plans shared with students and parents at their Induction evening.

Students requested to read book over the summer holidays and complete workbook.

Author invited to conduct workshops in school in September.

C Kelly

(N Walmsley)

October half term

 

 

Encourage reading: Year 7&8 book boxes

 

Encouraging students to develop a love of reading at a young age will help them acquire the literacy skills necessary for them to be able to access the wider curriculum successfully.

Books have been purchased so that all yr7&8 forms have a book box.

Form time activities include one session per week where students are expected to read.

C Kelly

(N Walmsley)

Half termly

Encourage reading: restock library with age appropriate fiction and increase library opening hours to increase accessibility for all students.

Encouraging students to develop a love of reading at a young age will help them acquire the literacy skills necessary for them to be able to access the wider curriculum successfully.

Opening hours of library to be publicised across school.

Attendance to the library/ borrowing records are monitored.

Students are questioned about the books that they would like to read. Books purchased to reflect students’ interests and with the aim of broadening their reading experiences.

S Roberts

(N Walmsley)

Half termly

Reduction in the number of FTE/ FTEC visits and C1 & C2 logs

 

Track exclusions by PP/NPP to allow comparisons to be made (& interventions to be targeted appropriately)

Understanding school exclusion patterns and identifying students at risk of exclusion will enable a pro-active approach aimed at vulnerable students.

Analysis to be completed in time for full Governors meeting where DHT provides update on PP provision.

N Walmsley

Following analysis/ 3 times per year

‘Entry to FTEC’ interview conducted by Deputy Head teacher with the parents and students at the start of their day in FTEC

Increasing parental engagement when behavioural issues are identified has had a positive impact previously. Parents have shown increased support for school and behaviour of targeted students has improved.

PL inform parents of their appointment time with Deputy Headteacher when they are informed their child is in FTEC.

Students do not return to lessons until interview has taken place.

N Walmsley

Half termly

 

 

FTEC office staffed by Senior staff

Students see time in FTEC as being a serious issue in response to poor behaviour. Discussion about the incident with senior colleagues supports this.

Senior staff have time allocated to their timetable.

J Hoyle

Half termly

 

 

‘Return to school’ meeting interviews following exclusions

Increasing parental engagement following behavioural issues has had a positive impact previously. Parents have shown increased support for school and behaviour of targeted students has improved.

Parents are notified of the date and time of their meeting when they receive notification of the exclusion.

N Walmsley

Half termly

Engagement and attainment of students

Outward Bound activity residential for all year 7&8 students

There is strong evidence that resilience in the classroom can be developed via the development of teamwork and communication skills through outdoor activity.

Colleague has ‘outdoors education’ as part of TLR.

Advance booking established with outdoor activity centre for October 2017.

Information sent to all parents of students in Year 7&8 and permission slips/ medical forms returned.

School calendar has dates of all visits.

T Corcoran

Following students’ return and then termly

 

 

Facility is available for students to complete homework before school, during break times and after school

Some students do not have a designated space to work and such a facility was requested via student voice. Removing barriers where they exist help students to remain engaged fully in their education.

Homework clubs at 3pm highlighted on SCAMPs timetable and publicised with students.

Progress Leaders offer homework club facility every lunch time for students in their year group.

Where barriers have been identified or where students attend Friday homework detention, progress leaders will work with students to remove barriers.

S Roberts

Progress leaders

(N Walmsley)

Half termly review of attendance to Friday detention.

 

 

All students are able to progress onto their chosen pathway (course/ apprenticeship) which is appropriate to their ability.

Individual interviews

Support sessions

 

Individual CEIAG sessions will be used as an additional intervention to address issues presented by students (underachievement/ negative approach to learning/ behavioural issues).

Clear identification of vulnerable students via PL.

Students referred to Mrs Long for individual intervention.

Feedback re from meetings and agreed outcomes shared with PL.

Students discussed at pastoral leaders’ meeting

J Long

(J Hoyle)

Half termly

Increased levels of parental engagement.

All parents attend a meeting with the Deputy Head (T&L) prior to their child spending time in FTEC.

Evidence suggests that where there is good communication between school and home, behaviour can be improved. We have found that when parents are actively involved in supporting school with behavioural issues that there is a positive impact on the child’s behaviour.

Clear procedures are in place; parents are invited to attend a meeting when informed of their child’s visit to FTEC.

N Walmsley

Half termly

All outcomes

Individual response to students’ needs

Removing barriers to effective participation in all aspects of school life will help to raise achievement. This includes ensuring that all students have appropriate uniform and equipment as well as additional requirements for specific subjects.

Regular review of known barriers to students (via PL) and discussion re interventions required.

Assistance requests submitted to DHT

Work towards barrier removal.

J Hoyle

 

 

 

Total budgeted cost

£ 70,659

 

Total budgeted cost

£241,487

 

  1. Review of expenditure

Previous Academic Year

2016-2017

  1. Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on students not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

OUTCOME 1

A. Improved Year 7 Literacy/ Numeracy progress of students eligible for PP

 

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

Internal moderation of students’ work and CPD on standardisation with external schools

Impact of intervention: Medium-High: Standardisation sessions been attended by all subjects ensuring staff have received guidance re the grading of work. Information has been shared within subject teams. Staff have increased confidence in understanding the new 9-1 grading. Improvement guidance has been provided to students via marking and feedback. All students and staff have benefited from this action.

 

Impact against initial success criteria: Mixed

  • Year 7 DC3 showed that 61.4% of PP students achieved/exceeded their MEG in English which is in line with NPP students; 63.2% of PP students achieved/ exceeded their MEG in Maths which is slightly below NPP students.
  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.

 

Moderation will continue within the routine meeting cycle to ensure that work is being correctly graded and students are being given appropriate advice to help them progress further. Specific subject network meetings offer the opportunity to standardise across schools.

£2,610

OUTCOME 2

A. Improved Year 7 Literacy/ Numeracy progress of students eligible for PP

 

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

Re-writing detailed KS3 & KS4 schemes of work with clear objectives & outcomes for different ability bands

Impact of intervention: High: Rewritten schemes of Work are much more detailed, include greater challenge and ensure consistency of delivery across all classes. DHT quality assured schemes of work to ensure that they meet the standard laid out by the school. All students have benefited from this action.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • Year 7 DC3 showed that 61.4% of PP students achieved/exceeded their MEG in English which is in line with NPP students; 63.2% of PP students achieved/ exceeded their MEG in Maths which is slightly below NPP students.
  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.

 

Updated schemes of work have ensured that curriculum orders at both KS3 and KS4 are being met. Updating all schemes of work has been a challenging task to complete; from now on, regular reviews will be calendared to ensure that opportunity to reflect on and amend schemes of work is provided.

None

OUTCOME 3

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

 

Investment in technology to support students’ learning; for example, GCSE Pod,

Impact of intervention: High: 86% of PP students activated their GCSE Pod account and accounted for 369/968 of the pods which were downloaded/ streamed. Business Studies/ Computing used it as part of their weekly homework programme and History used it in after school revision sessions. Subjects viewed since September include: Business Studies, Computing, Biology, Chemistry, English, French, Geography, History, PE and ICT.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • Verbal feedback from PP students who accessed GCSE Pod for revision was very positive.

Students appreciate the use of technology to help them learn and in many cases, it increases their engagement with a subject. Usage of technology is higher when there are frequent reminders from staff or when it is part of a structured programme. Investment in technology will continue.

£15,047

OUTCOME 4

A. Improved Year 7 Literacy/ Numeracy progress of students eligible for PP

 

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

Investment in technology to support students’ learning; for example, Show My Homework so that home learning tasks can be completed independently.

Impact of intervention: Very High: Increased usage of SMHW by staff has ensured more effective communication of homework tasks to students. Parental log-ins have been well received by parents who have been able to support task completion and open conversations about learning with their children. The vast majority of parents agree that use of SMHW has been beneficial. This has benefited all students.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • Year 7 DC3 showed that 61.4% of PP students achieved/exceeded their MEG in English which is in line with NPP students; 63.2% of PP students achieved/ exceeded their MEG in Maths which is slightly below NPP students.
  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • Internal tracking data has shown a clear reduction in incidents of homework not being completed by students. There has also been increased liaison between parents and teaching staff regarding homework.

Feedback from parents of the information provided by SMHW has been positive. They report being able to support their child with tasks and monitor task completion. Completion by students is more frequent and to a better standard as a result of the amount of support provided by the class teacher. Rigorous systems underpin the completion of homework and it is seen as important by students. Investment in technology will continue although the school plans to move to Insight rather than SMHW for 2017-2018.

£3,749

OUTCOME 5

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

 

Raising aspirations of students by improving their self-esteem, broadening their horizons in order to develop motivation & engagement.

Impact of intervention: Low-Medium: Thought for the Day presentations for use during form time were prepared by the Aspirations Leader. QA has shown that their use is inconsistent. School social media is updated regularly with stories of successes of current and former students. Information regarding career paths of former students reflects a wide range of pathways. Identified students have experienced input focused on their career aspirations e.g. medicine.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • Students become increasingly aware of study options and careers available to them post 16. Focused CEIAG sessions have successfully raised students’ aspirations as evidenced through their progression choices.

Increase consistency of usage of information provided to forms to maximise the effect. Ensure regular QA of delivery of activities takes place in order to better understand the impact. The work on raising students’ aspirations will continue but QA of activity needs to be formalised along with feedback and actions identified. The CEIAG programme will also address aspirations through liaison with employers from a range of sectors.

£2,256

OUTCOME 6

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

 

 

Increased employer engagement and awareness of the link between the school curriculum and future study.

Impact of intervention: Medium: INSET held on 19th January 2017 focused on the production of information by all departments to support students make appropriate options choices as a result of better understanding how different subjects link into  future careers.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • Some of our HA PP students accessed voluntary sessions to meet employers and discuss their future pathways. Students reacted positively to the information that they received.

Increased awareness of the link between the school curriculum and future study and employment will remain a focus as we work to develop students’ aspirations. Ways in which we can further develop links with employers will be considered in the new academic year as we firmly believe that this is essential information for students.

£1,121

OUTCOME 7

C. Behavioural issues of students eligible for PP addressed

 

Improve attainment by reducing challenging behaviour in lessons.

Impact of intervention: Very high: The reviewed and relaunched behaviour policy has increased the consistency by which challenging behaviour is addressed. The simultaneous increased focus on rewarding positive behaviour has also had a positive impact on students and parents evidence by verbal feedback.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: High

  • There have been major changes to the school system for recording behaviour incidents and therefore comparisons cannot be drawn. As the year progressed, there were reductions in both the number of PP boys and girls who spent time in FTEC and also the number of days they spent there. 

We will continue to develop the consistency of application of the behaviour policy by all staff. The support network which is being developed alongside this is helping students understand and change their behaviour, this is an area which we would like to further develop in the next academic year.

£2,350

OUTCOME 8

A. Improved Year 7 Literacy/ Numeracy progress of students eligible for PP

 

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

Resourcing updated  Schemes of work appropriately to ensure high levels of challenge for all and the  acquisition of skills and knowledge highlighted within NC/ GCSE guidance

Impact of intervention: High: Ensuring that lessons are pitched at the appropriate level and that the acquisition of skills and knowledge is coherently planned is essential to raise achievement and close gaps. The new schemes of work are ensuring more detailed planning and consistent delivery. Increased focus on literacy across the curriculum is supporting the acquisition of literacy skills. Appropriate resources for subjects which allow learning gaps to be closed have been purchased and has benefited all students.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • Year 7 DC3 showed that 61.4% of PP students achieved/exceeded their MEG in English which is in line with NPP students; 63.2% of PP students achieved/ exceeded their MEG in Maths which is slightly below NPP students.
  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • External reviews commissioned by the school during the year provided positive feedback about the challenge and scaffolding observed in lessons.

 

Ensuring that the curriculum is appropriately resourced is essential, as is ensuring that resources meet the needs of the students and actively work towards closing any achievement gaps. We will continue having this as a focus.

£4,500

  1. Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on students not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

OUTCOME 1

A. Improved Year 7 Literacy/ Numeracy progress of students eligible for PP

Additional curriculum time to address the barriers to accessing the wider curriculum experienced by some students

Impact of intervention: High: In Maths: Increased curriculum time has provided students with the opportunity to acquire and practise skills which they previously lacked. Feedback from Maths department very positive in terms of supporting students achieve their MEGs.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • Year 7 DC3 showed that 61.4% of PP students achieved/exceeded their MEG in English which is in line with NPP students; 63.2% of PP students achieved/ exceeded their MEG in Maths which is slightly below NPP students.
  • Internal data captures show that PP students made good progress towards achieving their very aspirational MEGs from their relative starting points.

 

Increased curriculum time with a smaller group of students has had a greater impact than previous approaches. Therefore, the 2017-2018 curriculum will provide an additional English/ Maths session for our weakest students. Additionally, formalised and timetabled intervention sessions will enable us to focus on developing the literacy and numeracy of those students who need support to reach functional levels.

£10,533

OUTCOME 2

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

Weekly small group sessions in English for high-attaining students with HoF/ English specialist.

Impact of intervention: High: Achievement of students in the English GCSE examinations was very positive

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: good

  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.

Additional sessions will be offered to students as this has always had a positive impact attainment and this benefits all students.

£6,334

OUTCOME 3

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

Small group sessions in Maths for high-attaining students with qualified Maths teacher.

Impact of intervention: Medium: Achievement of the highest attaining students in the Maths GCSE examinations was positive and this action benefited all students

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: mixed

  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.

Additional sessions will be offered to students as this has always had a positive impact attainment and this benefits all students.

£13,582

OUTCOME 4

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

 

C. Behavioural issues of students eligible for PP addressed

One to one input for all students/ targeted students for IAG to help inform curriculum choice, increase motivation and raise aspirations/ attainment.

Impact of intervention: High: One to one input regarding CEIAG support has been very well received by students. The opportunity to discuss future plans has helped raise aspirations due to an increased understanding of what standard/ level is required for students to be able to follow their chosen pathway. Targeted students have also had one to one support as an intervention with a view to addressing underachievement/ negative approach to learning/ behavioural issues.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • There have been major changes to the school system for recording behaviour incidents and therefore comparisons cannot be drawn. As the year progressed, there were reductions in both the number of PP boys and girls who spent time in FTEC and also the number of days they spent there.
  • Students who have a record of poor behaviour or who are felt to be at risk of disengagement are also referred for additional support regarding their aspirations.

This intervention will continue as the impact it has had on students has been very positive. It is hoped to increase the number of students who access 1:1 careers guidance.

£4,314

OUTCOME 5

C. Behavioural issues of students eligible for PP addressed

Specialised programmes/ internal interventions targeted at specific students exhibiting behaviour problems/ behaviour & academic problems.

Impact of intervention: Medium - High: Targeted interventions matched to specific students with particular needs or behaviour issues have been effective. Mentoring aimed at identified students has prompted improved behaviour, the development of social skills and reduction in concerns logged.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: High

  • There have been major changes to the school system for recording behaviour incidents and therefore comparisons cannot be drawn. As the year progressed, there were reductions in both the number of PP boys and girls who spent time in FTEC and also the number of days they spent there.
  • Specialised programmes/ alternative provision has been successful in keeping students engaged in education.

A clear behaviour policy which is completely lacking in ambiguity has benefited our students. The underpinning support to help students change their behaviour is essential. Being able to offer respite placements or alternative provision to some students in order to keep them engaged in education is also essential. This approach will be continued in the next academic year.

£38,913

OUTCOME 6

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

All teaching staff have one hour of school support as part of their teaching allocation to contribute towards raised standards.

 

Impact of intervention: Medium: Areas of underachievement for targeted students were identified and staff have been allocated to support them in specific lessons. Of the 16 students who had school support 7/16 (44%) improved by ONE grade in the subject they were being supported in. Also 8/16 (50%) remained at the same level with only one student 1/16 (6%) going down ONE grade.  Although this initiative was initially targeted at HA PP students, other PP and NPP students also benefited.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.

This approach will continue in the next academic year. Colleagues will be given a clearer focus for their school support and will also be aware of how the impact will be measured. Impact will also be shared with colleagues so that they can review/ amend the intervention being offered.

£52,154

  1. Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on students not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

OUTCOME 1

A. Improved Year 7 Literacy/ Numeracy progress of students eligible for PP

 

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

 

Ensure that mentoring support is available for students requiring academic support.

Impact of intervention: Low-High: Year 11 students have all had an academic mentor allocated and have taken part in timetabled ‘formal’ mentoring sessions in addition to additional meetings arranged to respond to student need. The impact of this has varied between students according to their willingness to engage and the frequency of the meetings in addition to the formally planned ones. However, issues that have arisen from discussion between students and mentors have been addressed e.g. by the planned sessions on revision techniques and in-school sessions on how to create revision timetables in preparation for the mock exams

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • Year 7 DC3 showed that 61.4% of PP students achieved/exceeded their MEG in English which is in line with NPP students; 63.2% of PP students achieved/ exceeded their MEG in Maths which is slightly below NPP students.
  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.

It is essential that the match up of staff and students is appropriate in order for successful sessions to take place. Mentoring for Year 11 students will continue but on a more voluntary basis.

none

OUTCOME 2

C. Behavioural issues of students eligible for PP addressed

 

Review of school behaviour policy. Improve attainment by reducing challenging behaviour. Ensure that mentoring support as a behaviour intervention is available for students displaying challenging behaviour.

Impact of intervention: High: School behaviour policy was reviewed and relaunched to all staff with a focus on improving discipline in order greater engagement in learning to support reviewed. An initial increase was seen in behaviour logs as students became more familiar with the increased expectations of behaviour. Increased parental engagement has been effective in discussing students’ behaviour and preventing repeat occurrences. Key staff have adopted a mentoring role and have worked with students who have displayed challenging behaviour. 

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: High

  • There have been major changes to the school system for recording behaviour incidents and therefore comparisons cannot be drawn. As the year progressed, there were reductions in both the number of PP boys and girls who spent time in FTEC and also the number of days they spent there.

School policy has been reviewed and therefore this action is complete. However, future plans are to review the way that behaviour and interventions are logged in order that clear overviews are available for all students.

£6,498

OUTCOME 3

D. Increased attendance rates of students eligible for PP

Attendance Officer and Progress Leaders monitor students and immediately follow up truancies/ unauthorised absences. 

Impact of intervention: High: Attainment cannot be improved if students are absent from school and therefore this has been a priority action. Clear procedures are in place to address absence and these are adhered to consistently by the pastoral teams. Where barriers to attendance have been identified, interventions have ensured that these have been removed and a visible improvement in attendance has been observed.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Good

  • PA for PP students stood at 11.08% at the end of HT4. Whole school attendance was 95.83% with PP attendance being 94.40% and NPP attendance: 96.26%. Although PP attendance did not quite increase to 95%, there was a large improvement since the previous year.

 

This approach will continue. The support provided by the Attendance Officer and progress Leaders has increased attendance which has a direct impact on attainment.

£50,746

OUTCOME 4

A. Improved Year 7 Literacy/ Numeracy progress of students eligible for PP

 

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

 

C. Behavioural issues of students of students eligible for PP addressed

 

D. Increased attendance rates of students eligible for PP

Appointment of staff to key roles (Standards & Effectiveness Leaders) aimed at closing the gaps that exist:

* PP monitoring/ student voice

* interventions tracking

* home & independent learning

Impact of intervention: Low-Medium: Standards & Effectiveness Leaders are line managed by a member of core SLT ensuring strategic leadership in line with the school vision. There has been a large increase in the opportunity for student voice in school within a clear structure including all students and SLT; PP monitoring has been taken back to student level to identify successes and barriers to inform future planning; interventions and their impact is discussed with ML and at department meetings; the development of home learning and independence is ongoing

 

Impact against initial Success criteria: Mixed

  • Year 7 DC3 showed that 61.4% of PP students achieved/exceeded their MEG in English which is in line with NPP students; 63.2% of PP students achieved/ exceeded their MEG in Maths which is slightly below NPP students.
  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • There have been major changes to the school system for recording behaviour incidents and therefore comparisons cannot be drawn. As the year progressed, there were reductions in both the number of PP boys and girls who spent time in FTEC and also the number of days they spent there.
  • PA for PP students stood at 11.08% at the end of HT4. Whole school attendance was 95.83% with PP attendance being 94.40% and NPP attendance: 96.26%. Although PP attendance did not quite increase to 95%, there was a large improvement since the previous year.

 

Elements of each role had a positive impact but this will not be continued in the new year. Instead, responsibility will lie with all teachers in the planning and preparation of every lesson.

£8,369

OUTCOME 5

A. Improved Year 7 Literacy/ Numeracy progress of students eligible for PP

 

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

 

C. Behavioural issues of students of students eligible for PP addressed

 

D. Increased attendance rates of students eligible for PP

Outward Bound activity days

Impact of intervention: High: All students in Years 7 & 8 have attended or are going to attend the outward bound days. Feedback from students about their experiences on the day has been positive with many understanding and recognising the skills they have developed as a result; team work and resilience being examples.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria:

  • Year 7 DC3 showed that 61.4% of PP students achieved/exceeded their MEG in English which is in line with NPP students; 63.2% of PP students achieved/ exceeded their MEG in Maths which is slightly below NPP students
  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • There have been major changes to the school system for recording behaviour incidents and therefore comparisons cannot be drawn. As the year progressed, there were redcutions in both the number of PP boys and girls who spent time in FTEC and also the number of days they spent there.
  • PA for PP students stood at 11.08% at the end of HT4. Whole school attendance was 95.83% with PP attendance being 94.40% and NPP attendance: 96.26%. Although PP attendance did not quite increase to 95%, there was a large improvement since the previous year.

 

The outward bound activity days were very successful in providing students with an experience they have not previously enjoyed and introducing them to the concept of resilience. This will continue in the next academic year although the format will be amended in order to minimise curriculum impact. Rather than one day per week for 16 students we will trial a 3 day residential experience

£6,266

OUTCOME 6

 

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

 

C. Behavioural issues of students of students eligible for PP addressed

 

D. Increased attendance rates of students eligible for PP

Duke of Edinburgh award Scheme

Impact of intervention: High: Currently, 13/41 of the Year 9 students engaged in the DofE programme are PP.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria:

  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • There have been major changes to the school system for recording behaviour incidents and therefore comparisons cannot be drawn. As the year progressed, there were reductions in both the number of PP boys and girls who spent time in FTEC and also the number of days they spent there.
  • PA for PP students stood at 11.08% at the end of HT4. Whole school attendance was 95.83% with PP attendance being 94.40% and NPP attendance: 96.26%. Although PP attendance did not quite increase to 95%, there was a large improvement since the previous year.

 

This will continue in the next academic year. Particular focus will be given towards recruiting PP students to take part in the programme.

£3,462

OUTCOME 7

A. Improved Year 7 Literacy/ Numeracy progress of students eligible for PP

 

B. Improved progress for high attaining students eligible for PP

 

C. Behavioural issues of students of students eligible for PP addressed

 

D. Increased attendance rates of students eligible for PP

Individual response to students’ needs

Impact of intervention: High: Removing barriers to effective participation in all aspects of school life helps to raise achievement and to this end we have attempted to meet the needs of students where this causes a barrier to learning. Items of uniform, basic equipment, revision guides, specific resources and transport costs have all been provided so that students can access the full curriculum. Where specific interventions have been put in to address identified needs there has been high levels of success.

 

Impact against initial Success criteria:

  • Year 7 DC3 showed that 61.4% of PP students achieved/exceeded their MEG in English which is in line with NPP students; 63.2% of PP students achieved/ exceeded their MEG in Maths which is slightly below NPP students.
  • HA PP students are achieving in line with HA NPP students in some subjects but not in all. Interventions were applied following each data capture and were monitored by subject leaders.
  • There have been major changes to the school system for recording behaviour incidents and therefore comparisons cannot be drawn. As the year progressed, there were reductions in both the number of PP boys and girls who spent time in FTEC and also the number of days they spent there.
  • PA for PP students stood at 11.08% at the end of HT4. Whole school attendance was 95.83% with PP attendance being 94.40% and NPP attendance: 96.26%. Although PP attendance did not quite increase to 95%, there was a large improvement since the previous year.

 

Being able to respond to students’ needs and removing barriers is essential. This will continue in the next academic year.

£7,000

 

  1. Additional detail
  • In this section you can annex or refer to additional information which you have used to inform the statement above.